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Tag: Pat Adelmann
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  • July

    Pulling a Rescue Out of a Recovery

    It was a beautiful Texas summer day in June, with the sun shining brightly and waves crashing gently against the shore of Stillhouse Hollow Lake. A group of friends decided to beat the heat with a mid-day swim and entered one of the many parks closed due to excessive flood waters.
  • May

    The Cornerstones of the District

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Fort Worth District held their annual Administrative Professionals Day luncheon before a packed audience on April 30, at the City Club in Fort Worth. Administrative professionals are the backbone of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Fort Worth District, providing essential support and ensuring the smooth operation of daily tasks. From managing budgets and coordinating schedules to handling correspondence and organizing files, these professionals play a crucial role in keeping the district running efficiently.
  • April

    Not Your Average Army Unit

    Imagine being an active-duty soldier, walking the halls and cubicles of your new Army assignment looking for someone in uniform to guide you in the right direction and not finding another soldier. There’s no motor pool, no weapons room, and no personnel office.
  • Army Holds First-of-its-Kind Career Fair in Arlington

    The traditional sights and sounds of Globe Life Field, home of the Texas Rangers, were replaced with something brand new on Saturday, April 13. Instead of fans wearing jerseys cheering on the hometown team, potential candidates from throughout the Dallas Fort Worth metroplex carrying resumes entered the upper concourse of the stadium. They were looking for possible careers with more than 40 Army organizations including the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Southwestern Division. The division had representatives on hand from Fort Worth, Galveston, Little Rock, and Tulsa Districts.
  • March

    Fort Worth District Park Rangers Are Refreshed and Recognized

    A small child’s life jacket is on the beach and she’s nowhere to be found. Two men are playing loud music while drinking at a campsite and one of them has a sidearm. A man sits on his tailgate with protected Native American artifacts and digging materials in plain view.
  • January

    A Special Kind of Hunt

    On a frigid Saturday morning in January, at a park in Navarro Mills, Texas, the unthinkable happened. Seven teenagers sat in silence as they scanned the area around them for movement. Instead of staring at a screen, they quietly watched their breaths turn into clouds of steam and rise out of the hunting blind.
  • December

    What Lies Beneath

    Hovering over the calm waters of the lake, a strange device silently surveys every nook and cranny of the unseen depths. With laser beams dancing across the bottom, it paints an intricate drawing of data points revealing the lake’s mysteries. From the deepest depths to the sunny beaches, LiDAR’s watchful eye holds the key to unlocking a world beyond what the naked eye can perceive. A thrilling adventure awaits those who dare to decipher the language of light.
  • November

    Following His Own Road

    It’s a long road from private to lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army, a road filled with highs and lows, twists and turns. For Lt. Col. Joshua Haynes, it’s also been a road traveled with the help of family, friends and mentorships.
  • October

    Hydropower: Harnessing the Power of Water for a Sustainable Future

    As the gates leading from Sam Rayburn Lake open, the water rushes towards the Kaplan turbines some 100’ below. The river begins to rise and swell below the dam as the ground below your feet vibrates with the power of the water’s flow. Fifty megawatts of electricity enter the grid to power homes near and far.
  • The One That Got Away

    The line went taut as it was pulled into the boat, there was no telling what laid below the murky water, but they knew a fight was ahead. Suddenly the water erupted, and the beast burst forth, it’s mouth wide open looking for something to bite. After a short fight and several rolls the estimated 11-foot alligator snapped the line.
  • August

    Making a difference, one project at a time

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers utilizes volunteers as a workforce multiplier across the nation which resulted in an equivalent value of more than $45 million in volunteer hours last year. Volunteers are filling roles at lakes across the nation. More than 2,100 volunteers assisted the Fort Worth District in 2022. Thanks to the volunteers, many of the lakes were able to complete projects that would have otherwise been delayed.